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20130211
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
, arbitrary cuts would jeopardize our military readiness. they'd devastate priorities like education, energy, and medical research. they would certainly slow our recovery, and cost us hundreds of thousands of jobs. that's why democrats, republicans, business leaders, and economists have already said that these cuts, known here in washington as the sequester, are a really bad idea. now, some in this congress have proposed preventing only the defense cuts by making even bigger cuts to things like education and job training, medicare and social security benefits. that idea is even worse. yes, the biggest driver of our long-term debt is the rising cost of health care for an aging population. and those of us who care deeply about programs like medicare must embrace the need for modest reforms -- otherwise, our retirement programs will crowd out the investments we need for our children, and jeopardize the promise of a secure retirement for future generations. but we can't ask senior citizens and working families to shoulder the entire burden of deficit reduction while asking nothing more from the
to achieve real growth until our economy. one of the best ways to encourage growth is through our energy industry. god also blessed america with abundant coal and natural gas. instead of wasting more money on companies let's open up federal land for exploration. we can grow our energy industry, it will make us energy independent and it will help bring administering back from places like china. simplifying our tax code will also help the middle class because it will make it easier for smaller businesses to hire and grow. we agree with the president, we should lowerer our corporate tax rate so companies will bring their money and jobs back here from overseas. we can also help grow the economy if we have a legal immigration system that allows us to attack the best and brightest. -- attract the best and the brightest. first, we must follow through on the broken promises of the past to secure our borders and enforce our laws. helping the middle class grow also requires an education system that brings the skills that jobs entail. we need to incentivize local schools and career training. we nee
and manufacturing, and energy, infrastructure, housing, all these will help entrepreneurs in small business owners expand and create new jobs. but none of it will matter unless we also equipped our citizens with the skills and training to fill those jobs. [applause] and that has to start at the earliest possible age. you know, study after study shows that the sooner a child begins learning, the better he or she does down the road. but today fewer than three in 10 four-year-olds are enrolled in a high quality preschool program. most middle-class parents cannot afford a few hundred bucks a week for a private preschool. and for poor kids, who need help the most, this lack of access to preschool education can shatter them for the rest of their lives. so tonight i propose working with states to make high-quality preschool available to every single child in america. [applause] every dollar we invest in high quality childhood education can save seven dollars later on by boosting regulation rates, reducing teen pregnancy, reducing violent crime. in states that make it a priority to educate our youngest ch
. there is a rhetorical energies spent about this, making the point that we want to make sure we keep our commitments to those who have invested for a lifetime and social security and medicare, a commitment i intend to keep. no one on either side of the aisle believes differently. if you saw that number and saw that we were going to increase by 40% by 2023, but you also knew that we would increase our 23, youce by 40% by 20 had the same number of taxpayers footing the bill, then you would not be nearly as alarmed by that number as you may be in a scenario that is different. i was hoping you could comment about the historical trend of how many taxpayers we have had purpose at the in those programs and where we are going in that same trend. >> we project that the labor force will grow much more slowly in the coming decades that and it has the past couple decades. one is the retirement of the baby boom generation. they boost the labor force growth. as they retire, they will hold it down. there is a end and the women's force participation. it pushed it up in the late last century. the labor force growth
of you also served on. i completed my career here as chairman of the senate energy and natural resources committee. i will say to senator bennett, you may not think you are getting old, but clearly i am. i remember we have a bennett who was chief of staff of the budget committee. i was very young and at the bottom chair. he had the same name you do. it was your father. what a terrific thing to come here and see you today and ask .'s this. -- and expenses. -- and experience this. over 50% of the federal budget should put the country fiscal path for the future. this committee will play a critical role in achieving that role working with the president and with the secretary of the treasury. as you confront the fiscal challenges ahead, i cannot think of anyone more qualified or more ready for this job than jack lew. in only understands the challenges our country faces, but has the experience and judgment to confront them. as many know, jack has been a dedicated servant for many years. a servant of the people. what many do not know is where the dedication that she has originated -- that he ha
on "washington journal." and in about 45 minutes, we will talk about energy and climate issues with republican issues with republican representative marsha blackburn
still make critical investments in education, energy, while also balancing budgets committee responsible spending cuts. >> thank you, madam chair. i want to disagree with those who say we have a spending problem. when they talk about it, like there is an assumption that somehow we are a nation broke and cannot afford these things any longer. we are too broke to invest in education and housing. we are the richest nation in the history of the world. we are now the richest nation in the world. we have the highest per-capita income of any major nation. if we are so rich, what are we so broke? is it a spending problem? no. it is because we have a misallocation of capital. and the wealth. all of this wealth that has been built up by hard working americans has been accumulating into fewer hands. then we have a tax code that is skewed toward the wealthy. a tax cut whittled with -- a tax code riddled with loopholes. that allows the wealthy had to fund manager to pay less rate of taxes that a nurse, for example. it is very interesting that all this talk we have about sequester talks about the prog
standpoint, item by item. the new defense that energy that we crafted under president obama posey leadership only one year ago. it is not that we do not understand that the department of defense needs to make a contribution to the nation's capital situation resolution. that is why we have accommodated billions of dollars in cuts over the next 10 years. they are beginning to make that enormous transition. that was on top of several hundred billions of dollars of cuts that secretary gates began, eliminating unneeded and underperforming programs. all of this is on top of the historic reductions associated with the winding down of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. i also understand that the taxpayer deserves very careful use of each and every defense dollar that we do get from you. that is why we have striven and will continue to strive to get better buy-in power for defense dollar. -- buying power for defense dollar. but they use of the taxpayer dollar is undermined by the sequestration. sequestration is not the result of an emergency. it is not because discretionary cuts are the answer to the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)